Temple Drama Club offers ‘Chronicle’ of local life

Will Wildes (left) accuses Nancy Moore’s Mayor Wilson of “killing” the internet.

Will Wildes (left) accuses Nancy Moore’s Mayor Wilson of “killing” the internet. STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

Will Wildes (left) expresses anger over losing the internet in “The Day the Internet Died.”

Will Wildes (left) expresses anger over losing the internet in “The Day the Internet Died.” STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

Dan Cournoyer and Julie McAdoo rehearse a section of “The Day the Internet Died.”

Dan Cournoyer and Julie McAdoo rehearse a section of “The Day the Internet Died.” STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

Dan Cournoyer and Julie McAdoo rehearse a section of “The Day the Inernet Died.”

Dan Cournoyer and Julie McAdoo rehearse a section of “The Day the Inernet Died.” STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

Temple Drama Club President Steve Cullinan directs actors for “The Day the Internet Died.”

Temple Drama Club President Steve Cullinan directs actors for “The Day the Internet Died.” STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

The Temple Drama Club rehearses for its upcoming performance.

The Temple Drama Club rehearses for its upcoming performance. STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

Nancy Moore rehearses for her part as Mayor Wilson in “The Day the Internet Died.”

Nancy Moore rehearses for her part as Mayor Wilson in “The Day the Internet Died.” STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

Props for “The Temple Chronicle” segment, which will take a humorous look at life in Temple.

Props for “The Temple Chronicle” segment, which will take a humorous look at life in Temple. STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

Members of a small town, portrayed by the Temple Drama Club, complain to Nancy Moore’s Mayor Wilson about the disruption of the town’s internet service in “The Day the Internet Died.”

Members of a small town, portrayed by the Temple Drama Club, complain to Nancy Moore’s Mayor Wilson about the disruption of the town’s internet service in “The Day the Internet Died.” STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

Temple Drama Club President Steve Cullinan and member Robin Downs discuss the direction of “The Day the Internet Died.”

Temple Drama Club President Steve Cullinan and member Robin Downs discuss the direction of “The Day the Internet Died.” STAFF PHOTO BY CAMERON CASHMAN

By CAMERON CASHMAN

Monadnock Ledger-Transcript

Published: 05-08-2024 12:06 PM

The Temple Drama Club returns to the Town Hall stage this year for its second production after taking three years off for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Steve Cullinan, who joined the club in the mid-1980s and became its president in 2000, said that last year’s production “went pretty well,” and the group was excited to be back on stage.

“We took three years off for COVID,” Cullinan said. “It’s just good to get back in the routine.”

Since the club’s formation in 1970, productions have typically followed a two-act structure, and this year is no different.

“Act 1 will take a slightly fun view of life in Temple,” Cullinan explained. “Act 2 is a look at the foibles of internet use.”

The first act includes the long-running “Temple Chronicle” segment, this year featuring The Drama Queens, which Cullinan described as a “slightly twisted, fun view of local happenings.” Also included in the first act of the show is a short play called “Is Uncle Seamus Here?” which explores the life and times of the O’Shea family as they navigate life in Temple. Both segments were written by Reenie and Steve Cullinan, with Julie McAdoo and the rest of the cast contributing to “The Temple Chronicle.” The first act is directed by Steve Cullinan.

As with previous years, the second act features a professionally written play. This year’s second act is called “The Day the Internet Died” and was written by Ian McWethy and Jason Pizzarello, and published by Stage Partners. Directed by Robin Downes, “The Day the Internet Died” is described as “a funny, insightful look into what happens when the internet goes down for a week in a small town.

The Temple Drama Club has performances scheduled for May 17 and 18 at 8 p.m. at Temple Town Hall. Recommended donation is $5, with proceeds donated to local causes.

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